Political Powerhouses: Maxine Waters

Maxine Waters began her political career in 1976 in the California Assembly. Today, she is one of 12 black women in Congress, having represented the State of California since 1991. She’s recently been in the news due to her criticism of the 45th president. She received even more coverage when TV host Bill O’Reilly mocked and dismissed her, saying, “I didn’t hear a word she said. I was looking at the James Brown wig.” Though he later offered a (non)apology, Ms Waters replied on Twitter, “I am a strong black woman. I cannot be intimidated, and I’m not...

read more

Attending Convention Days 2017 in Seneca Falls

This past weekend, the Women’s Rights National Historical Park in Seneca Falls, New York put on Convention Days. Convention Days is held annually in honor of the 1848 Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls. This year has special significance because 2017 marks 100 years since women in New York State achieved the right to vote. Participating organizations in the three-day event included UN Women, HeForShe and the Elizabeth Cady Stanton Foundation. The event schedule and other partners can be found here. I went to Convention Days on Saturday and got to experience two of the things that drew...

read more

Apache Doll

  Getting your first period is a big deal for girls. Imagine if your entire community knew about it? Some of us grew up in a world of privacy and shame around menstruation and puberty in general, while others celebrate this life-changing event with friends and family. This relatively simple doll, made of cotton and dressed in buckskin and beads, was used by the Apache to teach girls about the rite of passage to womanhood. This is typically marked by a celebration the summer after a girl’s first period. Called the Na’ii’ees, or the Sunrise Ceremony, girls go through a rigorous four day...

read more

Musical Gals: Barbara Strozzi

Music Period: Baroque era (1600 – 1750) Location: Venice, Italy Claim to Fame: Barbara published eight collections of her works and her music used the words with the music to portray meaning. There lies an air of mystery when looking at Barbara Strozzi (1619 – 1677). What we do know, however, brings to light an intriguing musical figure who is one of the most outstanding female composers in history. From a young age, she studied under respected musicians, and went on to publish eight collections of her music within her lifetime. This was an incredible achievement in the male-dominated world...

read more

Girls in Podcasts: How to Be A Girl

Looking for something to listen to on your morning commute? Want to learn about girls over your lunch? There are loads of amazing podcasts out there about and by girls. Join us as we share some of our favorites in this series. The podcast How To Be A Girl is both heartbreaking and heartwarming. If you’re scared of welling up in public, I wouldn’t recommend listening during the commute. Marlo Mack, a pseudonym, is the mother of a transgender daughter, who also blogs her story at Gender Mom. Marlo tells the story of how she’s raising her daughter, through a series of themes, scattered...

read more

Political Powerhouses: Gloria Macapagal Arroyo

Gloria Macapagal Arroyo was born in 1947 near Manila in the Philippines. When she was just 14 years old her father was elected President of the Philippines. As a result of coming from such a well-known family, she received the best education. She spent two years in Washington D.C. studying economics at Georgetown University, where she was a classmate of Bill Clinton. She returned to the Philippines, where she earned a Masters degree, then Doctorate, in economics. She then went on to become a university professor in economics. In 1986 she was appointed as the undersecretary of trade and...

read more

Pin It on Pinterest