No Time for Fear – Politicking Girls: Girls Speak Out Event for IDG 2017

This week’s column is slightly different, as I had the opportunity to attend an event in New York City at the United Nations last week. October 11, 2017 marked the 6th annual International Day of the Girl and the 5th annual Girls Speak Out event at the United Nations. I left the event feeling more inspired and motivated to fight for change than ever before. The U.N. theme for IDG this year was “Justice for Girls.” Several speakers repeatedly and rightly stated that justice for girls is vital for a just society. Justice for girls means equal access to a quality education, freedom from...

read more

Celebrating World Teachers’ Day

When you think of celebrating World Teachers’ Day, what teachers come to mind? Maybe a teacher from your younger years who knew all of the best songs and games to help you learn. Or a really great science teacher who guided you through hands-on labs. Perhaps a college professor who gave the best lectures about the Russian Revolution. For me, there is not a day that goes by that I don’t think about one of my teachers and their collective impact on my life. I think that they deserve to be celebrated everyday, but there is a special day just for teachers to be recognized for all of their hard...

read more

Think Global: Lessons from Botswana

Flights give me a lot of time to think, especially since I have the unfortunate gift of never being able to sleep a mile above the ground. As I left the Gaborone, Botswana airport and began the long journey back home, I settled into my unconscious mind and attempted to unravel the amazing web of new experiences, people, and ideas I had been introduced to over the last seven weeks. Sifting through riotous volleyball matches in the Okavango Delta, millions of newly learnt impala facts, and a night under nothing but the stars, one thing stood out to me, something that I felt had taught me more...

read more

Think Global: The Journey Begins

As I wait in Gaborone, Botswana for the new school year to begin, I face the same doubts and fears that anyone does before their first day at a new high school. The only difference is I’m also worried about whether or not I’m going to get eaten by a lion before I manage to graduate. This year I’m starting my first semester at Think Global School, a traveling high school that takes students around the world as they learn math, humanities, and all that other high school stuff. Basing itself in four countries a year, the school currently consists of thirty 10th and 11th...

read more

Qing Girls

  A young girl made of bronze, holding an object we can’t identify, pleading with us to call her by name. That seems to be the story of so many girls in Qing China, the last imperial dynasty of an ancient land. The Qing dynasty lasted from 1644 until 1912, becoming known as a multicultural empire that formed the basis for modern China. Yet it was a rigid society, known for its strict class hierarchy and the oppression of women. Like this nameless girl, many girls in the Qing dynasty were expected to be silent. Though educated, it was only so that they could take their place as teachers...

read more

No Time For Fear – Politicking Girls: New girl-centered U.N. role for Malala Yousafzai

Pakistani human rights and education activist, Malala Yousafzai, has had quite the busy week last week. She was named a U.N. Messenger of Peace, which is an honorary title conferred by the U.N. Secretary General António Guterres. 19-year-old Yousafzai is the youngest ever U.N. Messenger of Peace. She joins a list that includes Jane Goodall, Yo Yo Ma, Stevie Wonder and Paulo Coelho. The BBC reported that Yousafzai would have a special focus on girls’ education. Messengers usually serve for three-year terms and are responsible for promoting the work of the U.N. worldwide. At the acceptance...

read more

Inspiring Women: The Edinburgh Seven

The Edinburgh Seven were a group of women who were the first to study at any British University. These women were Sophia Jex-Blake, Isabel Thorne, Edith Pechey, Matilda Chaplin, Helen Evans, Mary Anderson, and Emily Bovell. Sophia Jex-Blake had applied to study medicine in March 1869 but the University Court rejected her application on the grounds that the university could not make the necessary arrangements ‘in the interest of one lady’. Sophia took to The Scotsman and other newspapers to ask other women to join her petition. Isabel Thorne and Edith Pechey were the first two to...

read more

No Time For Fear – Politicking Girls: Teen Vogue: Leading the Resistance

I think it’s pretty safe to say that the majority of the world seems to underestimate the power of teenage girls. The recent political renaissance of Teen Vogue proves that. The magazine’s editorial staff firmly believes that girls and young women can be interested in both fashion and politics. When Teen Vogue took a stand and began to educate its readership about political events, people seemed shocked. I think that shock and outrage is ridiculous. If people were taken aback by the new political and activist tone of Teen Vogue, then they obviously haven’t been paying attention to content in...

read more

Scholarship available for young women in STEM

We here at Girl Museum are strong believers of women in STEM, and are excited that Dotcom-Monitor shares that enthusiasm. Not only did they want to start a scholarship program, but they let one of their interns, Julia Garbuz, take the lead! With Julia’s guidance, the scholarship was developed to assist other young women pursuing degrees in computer science, computer engineering, or another closely related technical field. In her words: As a woman pursuing a major in computing, I thought it would be interesting to direct the scholarship towards students on a similar path. There are very...

read more

Angelina Jolie: A Humanitarian Warrior

I find Angelina Jolie Pitt completely fascinating, not only is she an award winning actress but she’s also known for her extensive list of humanitarian work throughout the world. When I was younger I’m ashamed to say that the only thing I knew about her was her role in the 2001 film Lara Croft: Tomb Raider, which while incredibly cheesy in parts, is still a role portraying female independence. However, it was during the filming of this role in Cambodia that Jolie Pitt first encountered the devastating effects of a war-torn country on its refugees that sparked her into devoting herself to a...

read more

Pin It on Pinterest