15 October 2017: Make Every Day Girl’s Day

“Educating Girls is key to tackling global poverty” – a Guardian headline from last week’s issue. Frankly, yes, educating girls will eventually empower them. It could possibly be the road to a better life, full of their own skills and choices. And it may even change the world. So far, so theory. There are more than enough campaigns and a lot of media coverage for better girl’s education. But I haven’t come across too much publicity for educating the world about girls. Even if we have well-trained young ladies from Alaska to Zanzibar chasing after their dreams, there are still way too many...

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Letter from the Editor XV

Dear Reader, Over the past week, the world has been celebrating International Day of the Girl, and many groups, activists and celebrities focused on girl projects. The media followed along, so for several days before and after, the public seemed to take a bit more notice of what matters for girls. But it’s important to pay attention every day, every week. For example, how Syrian Girl Scouts still keep on doing what they love, how Indian female students challenge society, how Yazidi girls fled their ISIS punishers and find their way back into life. There is so much that we must not forget, so...

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30 September 2017: Never again, again

The Rohingya people are being killed. By their government. This is called genocide. This is not new. This has become a recurring theme of the 21st century, and we are not even 20 years in. Persecution and execution of people who are not in the majority is something people have become very good at turning a blind eye to, especially when it is isn’t them. Not only are people being killed, but those who have been able to flee are now in refugee camps in Bangladesh where there are countless orphans and unaccompanied minors are in great danger of being abused or trafficked. ‘Never...

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Letter From the Editor XIV

  Dear Reader, Much of the news over the past two weeks has been beyond the pale. Genocide, refugees, child rape, trafficking, prostitution grooming, and on and on. The stories are even more devastating when you really consider that they are real. Real people, real lives, really happening now. Not just sound bytes, digital images or daily feeds. We are particularly distressed about what is happening with the Rohingya people fleeing Myanmar, and their situation in Bangladesh. Read and share. With strength and hope, Ashley E. Remer Editor Girl News...

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15 September 2017: Is there a Need?

Is there a need? There is a long list of things we shouldn’t need, but they exist. Psychological specialisation on traumatised child soldiers. Homes for underage mothers. Campaigns to eliminate stigmatisation over menstruation symptoms. A maternity wear collection for twelve-year-olds. This list could go on and on. Yet most of these things are day to day business for many people. The maternity wear for young girls is not intended for sale, it’s a wake up call. And the rest should be too. Yes, it’s a good thing we have them, but then again it’s not. No child should be forced to kill, no girl...

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Letter from the Editor XVIII

Dear Reader, There are many things that exist that we should not need. Say, a maternity collection for twelve-year-olds. And we are clearly in need of basic things that many cannot afford – for example sanitary pads and tampons, and not only in developing countries. Even in Europe, female hygiene articles are taxed as ‘luxury goods’. And then there are things we do need, but may not know it. Things that are brought into this world by fearless girls and their supporters. Boxing Pakistani girls, skater girls from Afghanistan, health educators from Uganda. Slowly, the scales are moving in the...

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30 August 2017: Cowards All

“If you see something, say something.” This phrase has been plastered all over subways, busses, airports, and other public places around the world since September 11, 2001. We see it so often, we have become numb to it. Because we see things everyday that are outrageous, intolerable, and demanding action, it has become the norm, and most people do nothing. Oh, yeah, we do something—we get out our phones. Not to make a phone call to the police or security or emergency services, but to record. We have become a society of documentarians rather than humanitarians. It fulfills the social...

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Letter from the Editor XVII

Dear Reader, We live in a world of extremes. On one side, a young girl bows to thank a stranger for a kindness, and on the other she is raped, refused an abortion, and gives birth at the age of 10. The depravity and degradation of the negative acts seem to grow each day, as do the generosity and compassion of the positive ones. This issue will find you wondering why girls continue to be the targets of such extremes of human behavior. Let us hope there is a middle path. With Strength and Hope, -Ashley E Remer Editor Girl News International To view the latest issue of Girl News International,...

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Letter from the Editor XVI

Dear Reader, The easiest way to kill an idea is to not say it out loud. The easiest way to make women disappear is to not say their names, or even acknowledge the fact they have one. And there are so many more ways of hushing female lives: not letting their dance be seen, their song be heard, their knowledge be passed on. But women are speaking up and acting up. In Afghanistan, women are campaigning for their right of name. A hijab-wearing heavy metal girl group from Indonesia continue to do what they love. A young Indian girl will not be silenced in her fight against child marriage. And in...

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15 August 2017: Say it out loud

Deprived of her name, a women ceases to exist. She cannot be addressed for who and what she is, a human being in her own right. The only way to speak of her is to link her to a function – a daughter, a wife, a sister, all of a man. Afghan women are now fighting back, demanding their names to be said out loud, to be put on birth certificates and tombstones. Hushing up something to make it disappear is a universal phenomenon. And it isn’t just men trying to make women disappear; it is everyone who pushes a problem out of sight by not giving it a name – or not using the name it has. Most...

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