Teen Screen Feminism, featuring Junior Girl Emily Chandler

Dr. Athena Bellas has a fantastic blog and podcast called Teen Screen Feminism which explores – in her words – the “non-academic discussion of all the ideas around feminism, screen cultures, and girlhood.” It’s amazing, and if you haven’t already checked it out, I strongly suggest you do. Try starting with two podcasts that feature Girl Museum’s own Junior Girl Emily Chandler! The first podcast featuring Emily is Queer Girls Onscreen: A Conversation with Emily Chandler, and the second is Halloween Special: Monstrous Girls on the Teen Screen. If you enjoy them,...

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Guest Blog: Girls on film: Visualising Femininities in Contemporary Culture

This is the first of two guest blogs by Megan Sormus, a PhD researcher at Northumbria University, whose research focuses on visualising femininities in contemporary women’s writing, DIY music subcultures, film and television. Writing for Girl Museum, Megan reports on Girls on Film, a recent conference on how girls and women are represented in films and television. How are girls represented in the media? Is it right to question such representations? If so, how do girls begin to defy such depictions? How much control does the girl have in monitoring her own image? And finally, what do we truly...

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The Yearly Photograph Your Mum Makes You Get

The first thing you see is her smile. The girl in black and white looks out the frame to you. The photo seems familiar to me; the pose of the children is timeless. We still pose like that now. But this photo is over 100 years old, yet it is still familiar. I am from New Zealand and I grew up immersed in the Maori culture. These are Maori children in the photo. Maori have lived in New Zealand for hundreds of years. Both sit still in traditional dress, but the girl smiles slightly into the camera in defiance of the Victorian convention not to. I love that! Growing up in New Zealand it is not...

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Alternative Girl: Explore your identity

This is the final blog post in this special interview series, within which Megan Sormus (Northumbria University) talked to Girl Museum about Riot Grrrl and her own ideas about girlhood. Passionate about music and music scenes herself, Megan talks about the expectations placed on girls in the UK, the ways in which she explored her own girlhood identity and the important role that music has played in this journey. Check out our previous posts, Alternative Girl: I wanna be a Riot Grrrl! and Alternative Girl: Introducing Riot Grrrls for more! How do you view the current expectations of girls in...

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Alternative Girl: I wanna be a Riot Grrrl!

The second in a series of blogs on Riot Grrrl, our interviewee Megan Sormus (a Ph.D. researcher at Northumbria University) talked to Girl Museum about alternative girl identities, considered and expressed through the Riot Grrrl scene. Check out our previous blog, Alternative Girl: Introducing Riot Grrrls for more of the interview and for information on Megan and her research! How have riot grrrls used the current boundaries of cultural expectations of femininity to create new ways of thinking about what it means to be a girl? “While any notable boundaries that work to restrict alternative...

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Alternative Girl: Introducing Riot Grrrls

This is the first of a series of blogs on the alternative girlhood identities offered by Riot Grrrl zines and activities. A sneak peek into our upcoming 2017 exhibition, Alternative Girl, this blog series includes extracts from an interview with Megan Sormus, a Ph.D. researcher at Northumbria University, whose research focuses on visualising femininities in DIY and music subcultures. Girl Museum’s 2017 exhibition Alternative Girl will consider the impact that women have had on current and past music scenes, and the alternative ways of viewing girl- and womanhood that their work has provided....

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Being a Good Girl

Recently a lot of articles have cropped up on my news feed centred on the ‘accepted’ behaviours of girls and woman across societies and around the world. One particular article by the BBC, ‘What does it mean to be a good girl?’ piqued my interest, as the article contains interviews with six different girls from six very different societies. Each girl was interviewed about what her society perceives as the ‘correct’ set of behaviours for a teenage girl or young woman. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Naomi Bya’Ombe, aged 15, states that her country’s education system only...

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Mythological Girls: Changing Woman

In the traditional Navajo creation myth, Changing Woman is both Mother and the personification of the Earth. She epitomizes the cyclical paths of the seasons: Birth (Spring), Maturing (Summer), Growing (Fall), and Dying (Winter), only to be reborn again in the Spring. Changing Woman also represents the Navajo girl’s journey through puberty, motherhood, and as elders of the tribe. First Man continually held up his medicine bundle toward Gobernador Knob at dawn. From this action, Changing Woman was born to First Man and First Woman. She matured quickly, in just four days’ time. At the time of...

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Guest Blog: The Spelman Course That Changed My Life: ‘Girls’ 

For a long time, I aspired to be a public relations and communications practitioner because I enjoy advocating and representing others. In fifth grade, the first time I represented others was when I became the class representative to room 17 at North Miami Elementary. I considered this my first political campaign; I made “vote for me” fliers from the pages of my composition notebook and handed out Oreos. Two decades later, I had no idea how me aspiring to be an advocate for my classmates and one Spelman course would change my life. On August 14, 3 days before the Fall 2016 semester began,...

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We’re on Indiegogo!

Girl Museum is the first and only museum in the world dedicated to celebrating girlhood. We explore the lives of girls – past and present, across all cultures – and showcase this history and culture from a girl’s point of view. We exist entirely online, meaning that you can visit anytime with no charge. Since we function virtually, we save money on facilities and utilities. Instead, our money goes towards making projects happen, giving girls a voice, and supporting the advancement of girl’s rights around the world. Since our beginning, we’ve focused on refining our techniques and assembling...

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