Mythological Girls: Ostara

Ostara, also known as Ēostre, is a Germanic dawn goddess who is widely believed to be the namesake of the Easter festival. She is solely attested as Ēostre in The Reckoning of Time by Bede in the 8th century CE, where it is stated that the month of Ēosturmōnaþ held festivals in her honour. Ēosturmōnaþ is the pagan Anglo-Saxon equivalent of the Easter celebration. These festivals were held throughout April and celebrated fertility and the renewal of life. She is always depicted as a young maiden: old enough to physically bear children but not a mother. Bede continued to say that the tradition...

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Mythological Girls: Pachamama

Pachamama is an Incan fertility goddess who is still worshipped by several indigenous tribes in the Andes. She’s also known as ‘Mother Nature’, ‘Earth Mother’ and ‘Time Mother’ and is seen with a primordial feminine image. In Incan mythology, she was a dragon deity, who presided over the harvests. She lived in the mountains and personified the earth alongside her husband Inti, the sun god. Pachamama is still believed to be a present force by some, who can cause earthquakes if she is displeased. Originally her priests would have sacrificed llamas and guinea pigs to appease her, as well as...

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Mythological Girls: Julunggul, the Rainbow Serpent

Julunggul is one of the many Aborigine names for the ‘Rainbow Serpent’ in Australia, whose name and gender varies depending on the origin tribe. She is both a creator and fertility goddess, and represents the rains and oceans which are believed to be the bringers of life. Julunggul herself represents beauty, fertility and health, with her symbols being colourful flowers and rainbows. As the Rainbow Serpent, she is described as ‘flowing’ into her believer’s lives, in order to bring them children and the art of healing. She is embodied in the oceans and waterfalls, as well as housed in both...

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Mythological Girls: Bachué

Bachué is the mother goddess and master of the Muisca or Chibcha culture, an ancient Colombian civilisation. They were native to the area now known as Bogotá, and gained fame as the origin of the El Dorado legend. Bachué was believed to have emerged from the waters of the Iguaque Lake surrounded by light, holding a three-year-old baby in her arms. They walked to the plains surrounding the lake and built a hut, which was then considered to be the first Chibcha dwelling. Following this, her centre of worship became a temple in the San Pedro de Iguaque area. In the years that followed, her baby...

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Mythological Girls: Minerva

Minerva was the Roman deity of wisdom and warfare, as well as a patron of the arts. A prophecy was told to Jupiter that his relationship with the Titaness Metis would bear a child powerful enough to overthrow him. In response, Jupiter swallowed her to neutralise the threat. However, Metis was already pregnant with Minerva and set about crafting armour for her daughter. This forging gave Jupiter a headache and he persuaded Vulcan, the god of metallurgy to split his head open with a hammer. As a result, Minerva emerged from the cleft bearing the armour and weapons of her mother. Minerva was...

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Mythological Girls: Guabancex

Guabancex is the supreme storm deity of the ancient Taino people. They were located across Florida and much of the Carribbean on islands such as Puerto Rico. She is also known as the ‘Lady of the Winds’ and was believed to be responsible for the onset of all violent storms. This also includes all natural disasters, such as earthquakes and volcanoes in the region. Guabancex was commonly depicted with an angry face in the centre of the image, with her arms flailing on either side in a S shape. She wasn’t believed to be a malevolent deity, rather a manifestation of the supreme goddess Atabey....

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Mythological Girls: Benten

Benten, also known as Benzaiten, is one of the ‘Shici-fuku-jin’, or ‘Seven Gods of Luck’, in Japanese mythology. She is the patron goddess of literature, music, and wealth and like many other Japanese deities, had a dual purpose in both Buddhism and Shinto religion. Being the only female figure in the Shici-fuku-jin, she is also often considered a deity of femininity and is believed to be the deity of everything that flows: speech, knowledge, music, and water. Her role as the patron goddess of music has caused her to be seen as the protector of geishas, dancers and musicians. Benten is shown...

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Mythological Girls: Pattini / Kannaki

Pattini is the guardian deity of Sri Lanka in the Sinhala Buddhist religion, while also being worshipped as Kannaki by the Tamil Hindus. In Sri Lanka she is also the patron goddess of fertility and health, particularly in protection against smallpox. Kannaki is the central character in the Silapadhikaram by Ilango Adigal, written in 5th or 6th century CE India. The text was introduced in Sri Lanka shortly after, and quickly became adopted into the mythology of the island. The story itself is said to take place in the 1st or 2nd centuries CE and tells of a human, Kannaki, and the relationship...

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Mythological Girls: Phosop

Phosop is the rice deity of the ancient Thai religion, and is one of many rice goddesses in eastern cultures. While honouring her is still practiced today, she is predominantly an ancient deity rather than a part of the structured mainstream religion. As such, her worship is now mainly relegated to rice growing villages. Phosop is also known as ‘Mae Khwan Khao’ which translates to ‘Mother of Rice Prosperity’. Ritual offerings are traditionally made to placate a rice deity during each stage of rice production. Phosop in particular was believed to be responsible for ensuring each person had...

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Mythological Girls: Malina

Malina is the sun deity of the Inuit people of Greenland, Alaska and other Arctic regions. The most common story in the circumpolar mythologies is that of her relationship with her brother, the moon deity Aningak (also known as Annigan in some locations). The story begins by saying that Malina and Aningak lived happily together while they were children. However, as they grew older they split into designated housing for men and women. After this separation Aningak noticed that Malina was the most beautiful of all women, and set to work on a plan to have her. While the two were playing the...

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