Letter from the Editor XXVI

Dear Readers, As Women’s history month has just passed, it’s a good opportunity to feature strong girls in this issue in order to keep the conversation going. Meet Autumn Peltier, who has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize — and she’s only thirteen years old! We’d love you to share your thoughts on the controversial articles that are headlining this issue. For example, should head scarves be banned for pre-schoolers in Austria? And is American-based teen mag, Teen Bo$$   — a magazine that promotes the emerging figure of the Barbie-like ‘girl boss’  — inspiring...

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Letter from the Editor XXVI

Dear Reader, It’s that time of the month again! Girl News has returned from last month’s hack, jam-packed with stories of even stronger, insightful and inspiring young women. We would like to thank you all for your positive responses and constant support of Girl Museum and Girl News International; we hope this issue will do much to return the favour. By now we are all familiar with the fantastically emotive activism of Emma González, but how about the impassioned work of 11-year old, Naomi Wadler? To close out women’s history month, we’re honouring those young women, celebrating them for the...

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Letter from the Editor XXV

Dear Reader, We have a thin issue for you this time. The reason? Girl Museum was hacked on International Women’s Day. While we do not know who did it, happening on IWD is no coincidence. While we will be rebuilding the site over the next month, please consider donating to help us with the ever-increasing cost of internet security. Now to the stories and the positive and negative ways girls hold the spotlight. As Emma González remains at the forefront as she speaks out against the high school gun rampage that recently shook the US (and won’t stop shaking for a while), Shahira Yusuf is...

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Letter from the Editor XXII

Covering the news, putting together a newspaper, even reading the news ‚Äì they all involve choices. Deciding what is important for people to know and to care about is a huge responsibility. For us here at GNI, focusing on girls’ topics does not narrow down the field of what’s out there, instead, it is even more challenging. One thing is for certain, though: stories like the abuse of hundreds of girls and young women at the hands of their doctor and covered up by institutions seems like a story to ring the bells from the rooftops. But it hasn’t been so. This issue of GNI...

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30 January 2018: Life is not long enough

There are certain situations where we want the surface to be the reality. Explosively strong girl athletes dressed in questionably tasteful gear, performing their best for themselves and for us. Keep running, jumping and winning. And, of course, smiling. Bring back those medals while grinning from ear to ear. Don’t give us a hint that there is anything wrong behind those smiles. That’s not what we want of you. We want silent and smiling. This is how Larry Nassar was able to get away with years of systematic abuse of these athletes, because they are girls. Girls being trained and...

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New Year, New Senior Staff

A new year often brings change: for many, new resolutions or re-commiting to past pledges come with the start of a new year. Here at Girl Museum, as we’re entering our 9th year (!), we realized the need to add to our senior staff. As we continue our resolution to provide girls a space that documents, preserves, and presents their history and culture, we realized the need to grow. So for 2018, we committed to expand our senior staff. Girl Museum continues to be run by volunteers, and the Junior Girl intern program is integral to what we do. But with our continued ambitious program of...

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Interview: Using Digital to Showcase Feminism in Cultural Heritage

Our very own Ashley Remer and Tiffany Rhoades cowrote a chapter about Girl Museum that was published in a 2 volume collection titled Feminism and Museums. Their chapter, “Using Digital to Showcase Feminism in Cultural Heritage”, focused on the unique challenges and opportunities facing Girl Museum in the digital age. Associate Editor Sage Daugherty spoke with both staff members about their process of writing the chapter and their digital goals for Girl Museum going into 2018. Tell us about writing the chapter ‚Äî how did that process begin? Ashley: We got a great boost from our...

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#MeToo and Girlhood in Art

Just look at the painting. You do not need any special pedigree, beyond being sighted. In fact, a blind person could tell you, if the painting were being described to them, that something is not right. This painting is called Thérèse Dreaming, by Balthus, and was made in 1938. Most girls Thérèse’s age (12 or 13) wouldn’t sit like that without being asked or compelled. Imagine how it felt to sit with your legs spread and your dress hiked up facing an older man‚ your next-door neighbor. No wonder she is looking away. Balthus gives the viewer permission to consume her image without...

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2018: Fierce Girls Ahead

  We are a museum. Our job is to look backwards and forwards at the same time. Guiding viewers to a place of knowledge and understanding is what we do. It is a tricky time for such tasks. In a time when 1 in 4 Americans did not read a book last year, our job is made that much harder. How can you learn from the past if you don‚Äôt know about it? We know that girls have always been there, taking a stand for what is right. And they continued to do so, throughout the constant barrage of injustices during 2017. Yet in spite of many people‚Äôs best efforts, there were ‚Äògood‚Äô things that...

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Letter from the Editor XX

Dear Reader, As we approach the New Year, this month‚Äôs issue of GNI is about reflection and looking to redefine what it will mean to be a girl in 2018. The Balthus exhibition at The Met is certainly a start. In light of the #MeToo campaign, museum educators have started to examine art history’s objectification of young women by questioning the content of some of the most famous paintings (read more about this exhibition in an upcoming blog¬†post).¬†Of course, this is not to ignore the negatives that still exist: if we can change the course female objectification by reconsidering the...

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